though we were stable stacked together, we can’t stand up side by side

book loverTHIS WEEK: the ol’ “boy-makes-girl” story

At the last Heaps show of the year on May 30th, we’ll roll out our more robust version of my new(ish) creation “One More Song For Mary” [you can listen to it as part of the stream from that show–may be the best performance of it yet], but for now you can listen to the stripped-down original version:

http://www.franzkeller.com/heaps/heapsongs/Mary.mp3″ (download)

The name “Mary” was chosen because it’s generic (no offense to any Mary’s out there)–certainly one of the more popular girls names in songs.  Hendrix, The Hollies, Supergrass, you name it. Of course, with all these other songs for her already, I’m not sure Mary needs one more song. Let’s face it: some names may never get songs, and those that do, well you’ve got about a one in five chance of it being something you’ll want some other person learning on the guitar to play for your anniversary.

This song for Mary is a version of the old “boy-makes-girl, boy-makes-girl-woman, girl-wants-boy-to-be-man, boy-wants-girl-to-be-real” story.  In other words, to quote the Rogers Sisters (R.I.P.) “fantasies are nice–but they’re just fantasies”–they can’t necessarily stand up in lived life.  I recorded this version back before I ever heard of Jay Reatard, but now it reminds me of him.  BTW: he’s playing LA in June w/ Thee Oh Sees (who are WHAT’S GOOD this week) so that’s awesome.  I’m a sucker for bands with boys and girls singing at the same time–it’s like what if Kurt Cobain was a hermaphrodite with a deviated larynx.

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2 Responses to “though we were stable stacked together, we can’t stand up side by side”

  1. […] version of “One More Song For Mary” we’ve ever recorded (certainly different than my solo version). New arrangements of “Aberdeen”, “Baby’s Daddy”, “Old Palo […]

  2. […] written and performed by men, the experience of women BY MEN becomes a pervasive preoccupation.  I myself am far from immune–exaggerated bitterness provides opportunities for inventive similes, overwrought narratives, […]

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